Motivational Monday: The London Marathon Edition

Congratulations! You did it. You dragged yourself out of bed. You worked out how to get dressed in this weird not-quite-warm-but-not-quite-cold-weather. You put on shoes. You brushed your teeth. You got yourself to school. It was hard, but you did it.

But maybe also spare a thought for the tens of thousands of people waking up this morning with insanely stiff legs and blistered feet, their fingers still clutching their medal… because they really bloody did it. That’s right, yesterday 50,000 people descended on the capital to run the London Marathon. All 26.2 miles of it.

As per tradition, there were scenes to make you laugh – people running dressed as loo roll (why?), someone attempting to beat the world record for the fastest ever Mr Potato Head (again, why?) a ballsy runner who squirted Wills and Kate with water as he ran past (but HER HAIR!) – and scenes to make you cry, such as 83 year old Kenneth Jones, who has run every single London marathon, or the guy who sacrificed his own race time to help a struggling runner make it over the finish line. Not to mention all the people who got engaged on the sidelines, or the couple who casually got married at dawn and ran the marathon afterwards.

As someone who struggles to run around the block, the sheer fact that these people can run 26 miles makes them nothing short of superheroes in my eyes. But most of the people running the marathon are superheroes in another way too: they’re running to raise money for a charity or organisation that they believe in.

Like 20-year-old Ruby Riley, who developed anxiety, depression and an eating disorder during her teens and ran to help break the taboo around mental health. She told the BBC, “I am now able to use exercise as a celebration of what my body is able to do when I treat it properly.”

Or 62-year-old Chris Arthey who is the first ever over-the-knee-amputee to complete the marathon. He ran to raise money for Leonard Cheshire Disability, a charity that supports disabled people in the UK and around the world.

And most excitingly, our very own betty writer Louise Jones completed the marathon for mental health campaign Heads Together. WE LOVE YOU, LOUISE.

So congratulations to every single person who ran – you’re all amazing. And if they can make it to the finish line, we can probably make it to home time.

 

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