What do you want to be ‘when you grow up’? While many of us have our careers mapped out from an early age, for others it takes years to pick a path – which is why you might want to take a peek at these truly amazing jobs.

While we’re sure there aren’t hundreds of vacancies for professional sleepers, these weird and wonderful opportunities do come up, so make sure you keep your eyes peeled if you want to give all your mates total life envy.

1. Waterslide tester


Testing fun stuff is always going to make for a great job and what could be more fun than waterslides? As a waterslide tester you travel the world, trying out new slides at hotels and theme parks, and report back to the company on everything from speed to potential safety hazards.

Probably one for stronger swimmers and adrenaline junkies.

2. Luxury bed tester

If riding waterslides every day sounds too much like hard work, you can essentially become a professional sleeper by testing luxury beds. This is one occasion when nobody will give you trouble for sleeping on the job!

Your employer will generally be a fancy mattress manufacturer or a hotel chain, and your role will involve taking naps in various beds, then reporting back on your comfort levels. Literally living the dream.

3. Netflix tagger

Fancy sitting around watching Netflix all day AND getting paid for it? It is possible, if you get a job as a Netflix Tagger, where you have to watch shows and decide what category they should fall under on the streaming site.

These taggers are also responsible for what ends up in your suggested shows, so you now know who to blame if they don’t reflect your interests at all.

4. Island caretaker

Imagine relocating to a private island where all you had to do was keep a blog and complete some tiny caretaking tasks? While these jobs are few and far between, they have been offered by tourist boards in the past, usually to generate awareness of a destination.

Tourism Queensland had a six-month position on the Great Barrier Reef, where the successful applicant was able to live rent-free, and was paid $150,000 for their blog and photo diary. Not bad work if you can get it, eh?

5. Chocolate taster


It sounds like something straight out of Willy Wonka, but chocolate brands need feedback before putting new products on the shelves, so of course somebody has to test the goods.

However, one of the downsides is that you’re tasting the chocolate before it’s been perfected, so you might have to eat some pieces that don’t exactly appeal to your palette. A small price to pay for a pretty yummy job?

6. Fortune cookie writer

What, you didn’t think those little slips of paper inside your fortune cookies wrote themselves, did you? Usually cookie companies will hire freelance writers to come up with the pearls of wisdom, but some do offer full-time positions, should you feel it’s your true calling.

7. Party planner

Love throwing a good shindig? Then perhaps you should consider planning other people’s. Officially known as event co-ordinators, party planners are involved in everything from scouting locations to finding caterers, booking entertainment and creating the overall look of the event.

While it can definitely be a fun and lucrative career, you also need to be able to stay calm under pressure, especially when the birthday girl is crying because her ice sculpture melted. Boohoo.

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

Image: The Edge of Seventeen

The end of school is nigh, and all of a sudden you feel like you’ve got 100 decisions to make. What do I want to do with my life? Do I want to go to college, or uni, or do I want to get stuck straight into work? It’s easy to feel lost when you don’t know what you want to do, or how to get there.

But while you have literally your whole life to make up your mind, a little bit of good advice can go a long way. So with that in mind, in a series of interviews, we’re speaking to women who’ve ‘made it’, and asking their advice on how to follow in their footsteps.

This month, we speak to Lydia Cherry, an interior designer.

What actually *is* your job?

I am an interior designer and mainly work on people’s homes. I meet people and chat about how they would like their rooms designed, which colour schemes would best suit the space and how best to create the perfect room for them.

Was this always what you wanted to do?

When I was younger I played The Sims, and downloaded loads of files of new furniture and designs so that I could create lots of different styles. I didn’t ever actually play the game, I just designed the houses. I would also help my mum with colour and materials when we were decorating our house. I guess I have always had a passion for it.

Describe your typical day

Researching new ideas, taking aspects of different designs and incorporating them into my own. It also involves drawing plans of the space, creating layouts, working on mood boards and then drawing 3D images of the design to create visuals for the client, so they can see how their space will look.

What’s the best part of your job?

For me, I like creating a space within a home that is relaxing, cosy and a nice environment for the people who live there. I love working with colour and texture too. Creating mood boards is something I am passionate about, as you can play around with different styles and create a feel for the space before going ahead with the design.

Are there any bad parts?

There aren’t many bad parts to the job really, but finding the right suppliers and trade companies can be stressful, especially when working to a budget.

The Big Question: uni or no uni?

I have a degree within interiors, although I think it is possible to get into it without one. Personally I would recommend doing it through university. If you ever wanted to work abroad, they generally ask for degrees.

What about A levels?

My A levels were in art textiles, photography and ICT. Choosing related A levels is always a good idea, and working hard in those to then gain the best grades you can will set you up well for university or college, depending on which way you want to go. Work experience is key, I didn’t gain enough early on, so I would recommend writing to as many interior design places as possible to try and get into somewhere to gain that experience.

Describe your dream house…

I still dream of my ‘dream’ house even now. A country-style, stone-built house with open fires and cosy interiors. Somewhere I could constantly work on and improve and create entirely myself.

What advice would you give to your 14-year-old self?

Gain more experience within interior design firms and concentrate harder on my school work. It sounds clichéd, but it sets you up for the next stage. I would also recommend learning 3D packages, for example 3Ds Max, Photoshop and Autocad as early as possible.

@EllieCostigan

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

The end of school is nigh, and all of a sudden you feel like you’ve got 100 decisions to make. What do I want to do with my life? Do I want to go to college, or uni, or do I want to get stuck straight into work? It’s easy to feel lost when you don’t know what you want to do, or how to get there.

But while you have literally your whole life to make up your mind, a little bit of good advice can go a long way. So with that in mind, in a series of interviews, we’re speaking to women who’ve ‘made it’, and asking their advice on how to follow in their footsteps.

This week, we speak to Rav Gill, head pastry chef at Llewelyn’s restaurant in Herne Hill.

Describe your typical day

I start at 6:30 in the morning and on a long day, I get a break about 4pm. I usually go to the gym or something—I feel like I should because I eat so much sugar! I honestly start my day with a cookie—then I come back for 5:30pm and work until 11pm. I am usually here all the time, I even moved down the road so I do actually live here!

What’s the best part of your job?

Tasting everything! And having creative freedom to use everything I have learned over the years to create something new. When you see people eating the food or they post a little thing saying how much they loved your food online, it’s so satisfying. Also, as a chef you can literally travel the world. I work at Llewelyn’s full-time, but I also freelance for different companies so I cook for VIPs and families on my days off. The money is finally nice—it does get good when you stick it out. You can also use your knowledge to be a recipe or food writer, or a food stylist too. There are so many different avenues you can go down.

Are there any bad parts?

Long hours, which means you don’t get to see your friends and family that often, and having a relationship is hard—unless they’re a chef, but you don’t want to date chefs, they’re all crazy! You become so close with your colleagues, though, which is nice. I now have friends all over the world, it’s awesome. You also get so many perks! I get to eat in lots of restaurants as I know everybody in the industry. Plus, you will never be out of a job. Everybody is looking for chefs, especially for pastry chefs—I know I’m plugging the pastry!

How did you become a pastry chef?

I actually did a psychology degree in Southampton, and I was meant to do a PhD, but last minute turned it down to be a chef. When I did my degree I just spent the whole time cooking for other people and I realised that was more what I wanted to do. I graduated, then worked in a chocolatier and saved up to go to Le Cordon Bleu in London, to train to be a pastry chef. Now I’m head pastry chef, but it took a lot of time and hard work.

Have you always loved cooking? Why pastry?

Yes, but I was so bad at it! Up until I was about 19. I do everything now, but I love pastry most—I like the finesse of it. I think because I have such a sweet tooth, I am so much more interested in it. Whenever I have a meal, I always obsess over what I’m going to have for dessert.

Wow, they are long shifts!

It’s quite typical to work around 80 hours a week—when you start out as a chef you have to know that your social life is gone. But I think a lot of restaurants are changing that now. At St John I only did 48 hours—it depends where you are. Generally the higher up you are, the longer the hours.

The Big Question: uni or no uni?

If you’re serious about doing it I would say so. You can’t really just pick it up, unless you’re willing to do loads of reading, because there’s so much precision. It can be quite scientific. There are three levels of diploma you can do: basic, intermediate and superior. You could get away with just doing basic because to be honest, no one is really looking at your CV—as long as you know the basics and have enthusiasm you should be fine! Enthusiasm is the most important thing.

What’s your favourite pud?

Anything with chocolate. My sweet tooth is SO big, there isn’t any dessert I don’t really like! Unless it’s savoury. I went to a super posh place recently and ordered the cheesecake, and it was actually just cheese. I was so disappointed.

If you could give one piece of advice to your 14-year-old self, what would it be?

I would tell myself to not be so fearful of following a creative path in life, and not to listen to my food tech teachers, who told me I was rubbish. They were wrong!

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

@EllieCostigan

The end of school is nigh, and all of a sudden you feel like you’ve got 100 decisions to make. What do I want to do with my life? Do I want to go to college, or uni, or do I want to get stuck straight into work? It’s easy to feel lost when you don’t know what you want to do, or how to get there.

But while you have literally your whole life to make up your mind, a little bit of good advice can go a long way. So with that in mind, in a series of interviews, we’re speaking to women who’ve ‘made it’, and asking their advice on how to follow in their footsteps.

This week, we speak to Tine Bladbjerg, jeweller and owner of A L’Etage 2.

How did you end up as a jeweller?

I always wanted to do something creative, I knew that much, I was fortunate that my parents supported that idea and they found me a jeweller I could do work experience with when I was 16. I was hooked. I was at the bench and they showed me how to do it, on the job. I finished school, took a year off and went to art college in the evenings to build up my portfolio and learn to do life drawing, then I got into college in Rochester in Kent. That’s how I ended up in England (I’m Danish, but grew up in Belgium). When I finished college, I moved to London and shared a workshop with two jewellers, then last year opened my own shop.

What are the best bits of the job?

I like to do a bit of everything. I’m quite enjoying having the shop, it’s been a good move for me. I sell my own pieces that I make in the workshop at the back of the shop, but I also sell other people’s work and when all the stuff came in to sell it was like Christmas—even if I can’t keep it! I still like the making and I still like buying the gemstones, that’s always nice.

Are there any bad parts?

A lot of creative people don’t necessarily like to do bookkeeping and stuff like that. When I first started I wasn’t sure if I was going to sell directly to the public or through shops and I didn’t enjoy knocking on doors very much, but some people don’t mind that. It’s up to you how you do it. Sometimes customers can be tricky! And there are a lot of jewellers out there—competition is very steep and you don’t always get into the shows you would like to. That can mess up your year and getting the rejection letters isn’t enjoyable. But you just have to keep going, and get back up.

The big question: uni or no uni?

I do know self-taught jewellers, but I think it’s good to have some kind of training—whether college or university or, if you’re lucky enough to get one, an apprenticeship. There aren’t many of them but they do exist, The Goldsmith Company do pre-apprenticeship courses too.

The thing about being a craftsman or an artist is, people often think that it’s something you do for fun but actually you have to do the business side as well. You need to have the skills to be able to do it, and you need to be thick skinned. When I came out of college I worked part time and I think that’s a good way to do it—going straight from college and thinking you can make a living self-employed is unrealistic. When I finished college, I shared a workshop with two older people who had been in the trade a long time, so they could advise and mentor me in a way.

I would say do any work experience you can get, even if it’s not paid. It’s because I did that I was able to get part-time design jobs for some quite big companies. You have got to be willing to put the work in. In some ways, it’s more fun to keep it as a hobby, because you only get to do the fun bits and there are no time constraints—for me, there’s always deadlines and there’s never enough time.

What sort of skills do you need to be a jeweller?

It’s partly design, partly making, so you have to learn the traditional way of painting up the jewellery, and how to make the pieces up. It depends what kind of business you want to be: if you want to design and make your own stuff, of course you have to know both, but I do know jewellers who just make other people’s work—maybe for a stone dealer or designer, or just people who come in with ideas but may not have the skills to make it. I like to do both.

If you could tell your 14-year-old self one thing, what would it be?

You’ve got to follow your dream, but be realistic. If someone offers you help, take the help!

@EllieCostigan

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

Image: Katie Edmunds