One of the most iconic films of the mid 2000’s, Juno is ten years old this year. Starring Ellen Page, she plays a wise-cracking sixteen-year old who finds herself pregnant and facing some pretty adult decisions. From the sharp-as-a-tack dialogue written by Diablo Cody to the brilliant soundtrack, this film really made a mark – here are just a few reasons why you should give it a shot.

Ellen Page

Director Jason Reitman had seen the then-20 year old actor in the thriller Hard Candy, and knew that Page would be perfect for the part of Juno McGuff, the sardonic 16-year-old who was secretly a big softie. She was involved in every step of the development of Juno as a character, right down to her wardrobe of flannel shirts in multiple colourways and the way her hair was styled. Her Oscar-nominated performance in the film is hilarious at one moment, and emotionally affecting the next. At first you think she’s this tough, sarcastic person but her vulnerability eventually shines through.

Michael Cera

In a role that was pretty much tailor-made for him, Michael Cera is adorable as the gawky, orange-TicTac addicted Paulie Bleeker – the father of Juno’s baby. A longtime friend of Juno’s, he struggles with his feelings for her and their stressful situation in his own sweet, goofy way. He was like the nice indie boy in your class that would never dream of interrogating you about music to feel better about himself. A real sweetheart.

A First-Time Screenwriter

After writing her memoirs at the age of only 27, screenwriter Diablo Cody wrote her first-ever film script. She drew on her own life for inspiration, right down to the tiniest of details, like Paulie’s Tic-Tac addiction: “I dated a guy in high school that loved orange Tic-Tacs and always had them on hand.” Cody never thought the film would be produced, let alone that it would rake in $231,411,584 globally. Not bad for a movie that was shot in just a month with a relatively teeny budget of $6 million dollars. Cody also won the Academy Award for Best Screenplay at the 2008 Oscars.

The One-Liners

If this film is known for anything, it’s the snappy dialogue. Of course, Juno gets all the best lines – “Yeah, I’m a legend. You know, they call me the cautionary whale.” Love it or not, it defined an era of indie movies.

The Hamburger Phone

Nobody can watch this film and not want a hamburger phone in their bedroom, and that’s a fact. We might not be able to remember the last time we used a landline, but who cares when it looks that cool? Cody herself included this detail because she had one in her teenage years, pre-mobile phones. Film critics were sent free burger phones as part of the film’s publicity campaign, and they sold on eBay for hundreds of dollars after the film’s release.

The Title Sequence

The opening titles of the film were inspired by vintage punk band posters, and it took designers at Shadowplay Studio almost eight months to create them. Ellen Page had to be photographed with a high-speed camera walking on a treadmill while chugging a bottle of Sunny Delight. These pictures were then used to make a stop-motion animation sequence that really sums up the warmth of the movie.

The insane soundtrack

Music plays a big role in the film, with Juno often making use of her encyclopedic knowledge of punk rock, as well as playing the guitar. Ellen Page had a key part in deciding what music her character listened to, telling director Jason Reitman that she would be into The Moldy Peaches. Former Moldy Peaches member Kimya Dawson agreed to contribute several songs to the project, which also included tracks by Belle and Sebastian, Sonic Youth and Cat Power.

The Legacy

Juno was on the top ten list of almost every major critic’s picks for 2007, and Page scooped up three awards for her performance. To mark the 10th anniversary of the film, Page recently took part in a live reading of the script with all-female actors (including Issa Rae and original cast member Jennifer Garner) to benefit Planned Parenthood in the US. As far as coming-of-age movies go, you can’t do much better than Juno.

There’s a show you might not have noticed on Netflix. It didn’t explode onto the screen like 13 Reasons Why or Orange is the New Black – it was released with only a small buzz. You’ve probably scrolled passed it a million times while you’re bored on a Friday night and looking for something new to watch.

It’s called The Get Down, a Netflix original series about the rise of disco and hip-hop in New York in the 70s. But on top of being an incredibly fascinating story, it deserved more hype since it was directed by one of the world’s most celebrated directors: Baz Luhrmann.

The Get Down

But who even is Baz Luhrmann and why should we care?

The business of Baz…

Known for his theatrical, slightly surreal style, Baz Luhrmann was propelled to fame in the 90s and 00s with his ‘Red Curtain Trilogy’ of films, made up of kooky rom-com Strictly Ballroom, Shakespearean tragedy Romeo + Juliet and the musical Moulin Rouge – all of which are completely delightful (and feature red curtains on the poster, hence the name), and feature his signature moves: bangin’ soundtracks, cartoon-like characters and totally dreamy sets.

Moulin Rouge

Baz Luhrmann is also known for his extravagance. Despite never having met him, I imagine he’s the type of man who would have peacocks in his garden and if he couldn’t choose between two enormous chandeliers, would just shrug and say “Oh, I guess I’ll just take both.” He’s the type of man who might sleep in velvet bed sheets and put on a fireworks display for his children’s half birthdays, because why the hell not?

It’s this decadence and opulence that makes his films so iconic. They look so beautiful that you find yourself completely incapable of looking away.

Wherefore art thou?

Most people first come across Baz Luhrmann at school, when an English teacher tries to tempt a confused classroom into understanding what Shakespeare was on about by popping on the dvd of Romeo + Juliet.

With Luhrmann’s direction and taste, this remarkable retelling of the world’s most iconic love story became even more dramatic and breathtaking.

Hand on heart, his adaptation is the only reason I like this play. Like, I’m sorry, these kids are objectively idiots and the plot is so absurd that when I read it at school for the first time, I didn’t understand why everyone always made a big deal of it being, like, the epitome of romance. But then I saw Baz Luhrman’s version of Romeo and Juliet and I got it. There are loads of films that adapt Shakespeare plays for modern times, (She’s the Man, 10 Things I Hate About You, etc.) but few are able to make the story work in a modern setting and keep the original dialogue without it even once getting boring. That’s the genius of Baz Luhrmann.

The ultimate film FOMO

In his glitzy 2013 adaptation of The Great Gatsby starring Carey Mulligan and Leonardo DiCaprio, Baz Luhrmann transformed the classic book by F Scott Fitzgerald into another quirky masterpiece full of colour and decadence.

But like so many great artists, he also has an amazing squad around him – especially his wife Catherine, nicknamed CM, his creative partner, who won two Oscars for the set and costume design of The Great Gatsby. It has now become my life’s mission to be invited to one of the Luhrmann family parties. I mean, look at this party scene from Great Gatsby. I don’t even like parties that much and yet I would give my left arm to be able to go to this one.

The Marmite of movies

Watched Moulin Rouge and just didn’t ‘get’ it the first time? You’re not the only one. Baz Luhrmann’s films divide option like basically nothing else. And they often receive lacklustre reviews when they’re first released, but then go on to become legendary cult classics a few years later. Which is a kind of reassuring reason to shake off the haters, isn’t it?

Moulin Rouge

[NOTE: The one exception to this is 2008’s Australia. Do not see Australia (I’m Australian, so I can say this). Soz Baz, but it is the worst film ever made. What was meant to be a tribute to your homeland became the longest three hours of my life. And it took me a long time to forgive you for almost ruining Hugh Jackman for me. Like honest to god, I can’t even watch the whole trailer without getting bored.]

But anyway! Despite the odd fail, Baz has cemented himself in Hollywood as a director that people are desperate to work with – and with a style that’s all his own. And with a stage musical of Moulin Rouge currently in the works (woop!), this definitely won’t be the last you hear of him.

Here’s to many majestic, over-the-top, lavish films in the future. Oh, and Baz, if you’re reading this, can I please come round for dinner some time?

@LilyPesch

You probably know about Wes Anderson, even if you think you don’t.

Ever since The Royal Tenenbaums in 2001 (featuring Gwyneth Paltrow back when she was still cool), the writer/director has been one of the world’s most distinctive filmmakers. Yesterday the internet’s movie nerds were giddy with the news that Wes’s new film, Isle of Dogs, has a poster and a release date (ok it’s a whole year away, but that’s just how much people love Wes Anderson) – so we thought we’d use it as an excuse to revisit the King of Kook’s most stylish hits.

Here are all the reasons to get watching Wes. Get ready for your newest design crush, incoming in 3… 2… 1…

1. Pantone perfection

Obviously we’re not saying we watch films more for the pretty colour schemes than the stories, but… well, if you’re the kind of person who’s been known to genuinely salivate over an Urban Decay eyeshadow palette, Wes Anderson is the one for your walls. From the lush Ginza-filter-on-Insta tones of Moonrise Kingdom to the perfect oranges and browns of Fantastic Mr Fox, his films are deliberately coordinated like outfits.

You know that dreamy dusky pink that’s been everywhere over the last year? Wes did it first! His 2014 Oscar winner The Grand Budapest Hotel has more candy-coloured charm than every velvet sofa and beetroot latte on your Instagram feed put together. Just LOOK at this poster. Look at it. Tell me you’ve ever wanted to stay anywhere more.

2. Harry Styles is a fan

In Hazza’s epic interview with Rolling Stone magazine this month, he described life on tour with One Direction as being like “a Wes Anderson movie. Cut. Cut. New location. Quick cut. New location. Cut. Cut. Show. Shower. Hard cut. Sleep.”

And it’s the perfect metaphor for a hectic, not-quite-real megastar lifestyle, because Wes’ fast-paced films give you exactly that giddy feeling. A bit spacey. A bit sped-up. A bit like being in one of those weird dreams you have after eating too much chocolate (in a good way). Watch his 1998 feature film, Rushmore, the tale of an eccentric teenager who falls in love with his teacher, to get a taste of what we mean…

3. Look it’s that guy! From that thing!

You can tell Wes Anderson must be a good boss, because the same faces pop up in his films over and over again. People like Bill Murray (with the grey hair, below on the far right) who has appeared in eight of his movies. Or Owen Wilson (you know, the blonde one from Zoolander) who’s been in seven. Icy cool goddesses Tilda Swinton, Anjelica Houston and Cate Blanchett have all graced his screen, and he’s responsible for giving awesome young stars like Saoirse Ronan and Léa Seydoux to our attention too.

The Royal Tenenbaums, a darkly hilarious story about a family of child prodigies, is full of amazing actors (and even more amazing Gwyneth Paltrow eyeliner lewks, more on this later) while The Grand Budapest Hotel has so many ‘wait, was that whashisface..?!’ moments you basically need to watch it with IMDB open on your phone. Do, in fact. That’s an order.

4. Wes wears it well

Guys, the clothes. If we said ‘fashion movies’ you might reach for the obvious – The Devil Wears Prada, Confessions of a Shopaholic, Coco Before Chanel – but wait. Stop. Because some of the most amazing style inspiration committed to film comes from Wes Anderson. Anytime you’ve seen someone look amazing in a faux fur coat, t-shirt minidress and loafers, it’s probably (whether they knew it or not) down to Gwyneth Paltrow as Margot Tenenbaum. So cool.

Meanwhile The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou has the best red beanies. Suzy from 2012’s Moonrise Kingdom has the most perfect yellow and pink shift dresses, and legit made us want to wear a beret everywhere. Heck, even Fantastic Mr Fox is stylish.

5. The music, man

Wes puts as much thought into his soundtracks as his style, which means retro tracks and scores to stir your soul. If you’ve ever wished you knew more 60s and 70s references (100% the best decades for music, but don’t tell your grandparents we said that or you’ll never hear the end of it) then Anderson’s earlier films are an easy way in. Watch The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou for its gorgeous David Bowie covers, The Royal Tenenbaums for The Rolling Stones and The Velvet Underground and The Darjeeling Limited for classics by The Kinks. Then acquire yourself some vinyl records and lie around in your room looking moody and misunderstood.

Margot Tenenbaum

6. Weird and wonderful stories that everyone can relate to

While Wes’ films are nearly always set in slightly surreal, vaguely fantastical versions of our bog-standard world, the bittersweet issues they deal with are ones we can basically all relate to. Love, heartache, sibling rivalry, weird-ass family members, unlikely friendships, finding sad things hilarious and happy things sad, craving adventure, and generally feeling looking for that person in life who understands you when nobody else does… they’re stories to make you laugh and cry, then laugh while you’re crying and probably snot out of your nose a bit.

Tip: watch them with the volume up loud. There’s a lot of hipster mumbling to contend with.

Illustrations: Manjit Thapp. Find more in her beautiful Wes Anderson zine.

WINTER IS COMING. I mean, it’s technically already here… but snow, snow is coming! The weather forecast is full of snowflakes and our heads are full of snow day dreams, thick socks and all the different ways we could toast marshmallows without an actual fire (sticking them carefully in the gas hob might not be as romantic, but it gets the job done).

With any luck, by the end of today we’ll all be three foot deep in the white stuff, literally incapable of leaving the house and in need of a huge stack of cosy, wintry films to hunker down with. So here are some of our all-time favourite winter (but not Christmas) films to warm your cockles.

And if the weather fails us, hey – that’s what weekends are for.

Edward Scissorhands

Edward Scissorhands

Way before Tim Burton gave Willy Wonka and Alice in Wonderland their gothic makeovers, he made magic with Johnny Depp in this gorgeous fantasy about a boy ‘created’ with scissors for hands. Taken in by a suburban family, gentle Edward turns his sharp talents to haircuts, topiary and beautiful ice sculptures. You’ll cry, you’ll swoon and you’ll have the urge to give yourself a creative fringe trim afterwards (don’t).

Lion the witch and the wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

There is probably no snowy tale more magical than this one, the story of four evacuees who stumble on another world at the back of a wardrobe – a world of fauns and friendly beavers where it is always winter, but never Christmas. And if a blizzard really gets going outside, there are two more films and seven books to plow through. Turkish delight sold separately.

Happy feet

Happy Feet

It’s penguins! Tap dancing! Tap dancing penguins! If that prospect doesn’t immediately fill you with joy, there’s probably a chip of ice in your heart. Get that seen to.

Cool runnings

Cool Runnings

Is this the ultimate underdog sports movie? PROBABLY. Or if not, it’s definitely the ultimate underdog winter Olympics sports movie, which makes it all we need right now. Let the true story of the first national Jamaican bobsled team melt your heart quicker than a choc ice on a radiator.

Ice Age

Ice Age

Ok so it doesn’t count as a 100% accurate history lesson, but the animated tale of a mammoth, a sloth and a sabre-toothed tiger battling the icy elements to return a human baby to safety teaches us that even 11,000 years ago, in a time before social media or school or the wheel, people still needed good friendships to get them through. Or sloths and mammoths. Whatever.

Groundhog day

Groundhog Day

Think you love a good snow day? How about having one every single day, the very same day, for hundreds of years? Yeah, thought as much. This classic 90s Bill Murray comedy answers that age old question asked by everyone who’s ever had a seriously crappy day: what if you COULD go back to bed and start the whole thing over again?

March of the penguins

March of the Penguins

It’s penguins! Real ones! Marching! More romantic than your average rom-com, this gorgeous documentary from National Geographic charts the progress of thousands of emperor penguins as they make the long, treacherous journey to their ancestral breeding grounds – and hopefully find love in the process. Pingu was never this emosh.

Little Women snow

Little Women

Louisa May Alcott’s tale of teenage sisterhood might span all the seasons several times over, but it’s those winter bonnets and ice skating scenes that really make life in the American Civil War look appealing. Cocoon yourself on the sofa and decide once and for all if you’re Team Laurie or Team German Professor.

Frozen

Frozen

Didn’t think we’d let this one go, did you? No chance.

For many of us, the place where we grew up is awesome. That’s where our friends are. That’s where our family probably is, too. We all tend to know everything about the best places to go. The best things to see. Oh and let’s not forget, the best places to eat.

There are all the memories too, like that tree that you fell into when you first rode your bike, or that bit of park where you took your pet dog. Or that piece of road where you chased your best friend for hours each day during tig or tag or blocky or whichever other silly game got you giggling for hours.

But you know what else is also really cool to check out? The rest of the goddamn planet.

Sure you might have been on a few holidays, and heading off on a six month round-the-world trip might not exactly be an option right now. But that doesn’t mean we can’t dream about magical destinations, far off beaches or huge adventures right now. This instant.

And what can really help us with our travelling daydreams is putting on a film that’s about travel or adventure or exploring faraway destinations – or maybe even fantastical ones. So pack an imaginary bag, bring your imaginary passport and don’t forget to pack your imaginary swim stuff. We’re going on a journey!

1. Brooklyn

The story of a girl who moves from a small town in Ireland to the bright lights of New York, New York in the 1950s, Brooklyn is a rather epic (and also extremely emotional, you have been warned) film all about travel. But it’s less desert island, wall-to-wall sunshine and lazing around on a beach and more about exploring a different city and finding out who you are and what you want in the process.

Does her heart belong in the big city or back home in Ireland? You’ll have to watch it to find out.

2. The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants

Any keen readers amongst you might know that this film is based on the book by Ann Brashares. It’s the story of four of the bestest best friends who have to spend the whole summer apart. In order to stay close and feel connected, they share the same pair of pants (which magically fit them all perfectly, because fiction).

One character heads to Greece, one stays at home, one goes to Mexico and the other heads off to the other side of the US, meaning there’s something for every level of adventure you’re craving.

3. Stand By Me

This classic film (and probably a firm favourite among a lot of your older relatives) is less about travel, but all about adventure. Four 12-year-old boys hear that a boy from their town is missing, so they trek off into the forest to find him. Sure, it sounds like a really simple plot, but it’s a classic growing up story with lots of wilderness and heartwarming tales of friendship thrown in for good measure.

4. Madagascar

Madagascar is about four best friends, who just happen to be a lion, a zebra, a griaffe and a hippo that live in New York Central Zoo, and unexpectedly find themselves on a boat to Africa. Eek! When their boat is hijacked, the animals have to quickly learn what it’s like to live in the wild.

It’s a great story about adventure, discovering new places – even when you don’t want to – and learning to adapt when stuff gets a bit too much too quickly. Or you find yourself on a boat unexpectedly, which might always come in handy too.

5. Up

The main character in Up is Carl, who has always always always wanted to go to South America, but never made it. The film is all about how Carl, now in his 60s, heads off on an adventure of a lifetime helped by a load of balloons and a little boy, teaching us all that it’s never too late for a big adventure.

(Just don’t use it for transport tips.)

6. Homeward Bound

Homeward Bound has a tragic beginning – especially if you’re a fan of your pets – when two dogs and a cat are left behind by their owners. Ahh we know, we know. It’s somehow sadder than actual humans left on their own, isn’t it? Sorry, Kevin from Home Alone.

The trio of pets don’t know what to do, so they decide to embark on a huge adventure across the country in order to find their owners. But there are all kinds of obstacles along the way, like rivers and, of course, lousy humans.

7. Life of Pi

Also based on a really popular book, Life of Pi is the story of one boy’s journey across the sea. At first he starts off with his family and their huge hoard of zoo animals in cages, but he finds the tables turn quite spectacularly after a big storm pulls their boat apart.

It’s one of those positively fantastical movies that moves between real and emotional and beautiful and magical. If you’re anything like us, you’ll feel like you’re watching a dream the whole time.

8. Letters to Juliet

This is the story of an American girl with big dreams of becoming a writer, who heads off on her travels to Verona in Italy, which is where Romeo and Juliet was set. While she’s there, she finds lots of letters people have written to the fictional character of Juliet. There are lots of people who sit there and reply and this our lovely main character becomes one. It’s a story about romance, writing and discovering a new place, all wrapped up in the legend of the Shakespearean classic.

9. Back to the Future

We couldn’t write a movie list about travel and not include time travel, now could we?

The main character, Marty McFly, is accidentally sent back in time by the quirky scientist Doc Brown. It’s a classic. And although it won’t make you want to travel the world, it teaches us a lesson in seeing things differently. Oh and it’s really fun. Did we mention the fun? So much fun.

10. Spirited Away

This is a truly fantastical, spectacular movie about what it feels like to move from one place to another. But there’s a twist. And that twist is in the form of spirits! Witches! Gods! Goblins! Spider people! Oh, and fairies! Featuring some truly brilliant illustration, it’s the perfect daydream film to get lost in.

@BeccaCaddy

In life, the list of film sequels that are better than the original is so short you could write it on the back of your hand (er… Shrek 2?) but hold onto your poodle skirt and pearls, because we’re about to make a controversial argument. *Ahem*

Grease 2 is better than the original Grease.

No but seriously. Stop laughing. Let’s examine the evidence.

 

The style

Grease 2 Pink Ladies

Sure, Rizzo’s Pink Ladies knew how to work a neckerchief and Sandy’s fairground transformation launched a thousand cases of thrush (she had to be sewn into those black trousers, guys, sewn) – but oh, what a difference a couple of years makes.

While the original Grease is all sugary late-50s petticoats, Grease 2 moves the action into the early 60s, and with it comes killer pencil skirts, cropped trousers, biker jackets and a ‘Marilyn Monroe vs Jackie Kennedy’ style war so good it’ll have you reaching for your history textbook.

 

The hair

Grease 2 pink ladies

Honestly, it’s hard to aspire to the rock-hard curls of Rizzo, Marty and Frenchie in Grease 1 because this is 2016 and only your Great Aunt Edna still has a shampoo-and-set. But OH what hair awaits you in Grease 2.  For one thing, it actually moves.

There are curls, there are sleek bobs, there are strong fringes, there are more curls (it was really the 80s, after all) and there is Michelle Pfeiffer with her perfectly tousled golden mane, here to remind us all of a time before ceramic straighteners were a thing.

 

The dancing

Grease 2

Sure, we all loved Danny and Sandy’s jive (not so much Danny and Cha-Cha from St. Bernadette’s’) – but Grease’s sequel really steps up the choreography. From the opening number, Back To School Again, to the end of term luau, via a bowling game that definitely breaks all the rules of lane etiquette, the second film has the sweetest moves by far.

Sorry, John and Olivia. You’re not the ones that we want.

 

The sass

Grease 2 kiss gif

Look, we’re not about to claim that either film is exactly a giant win for equality. But Grease 2 serves up significantly more ‘air punch’ moments for the feminist cause, as Stephanie challenges the ‘T Bird code’ and reclaims her kissing autonomy.

Altogether, now: “Maybe I’m tired of being somebody’s chick!”

 

The gender balance 

Grease 2 gif

It might seem like the moral message of both films is pretty dubious, but really they couldn’t be more different. In one, the geeky outsider falls for the popular kid and realises that the way to win their love is to totally change themselves, take up smoking and start wearing lots of uncomfortable leather.

Whereas in the other, the geeky outsider falls for the popular kid and realises that the way to win their love is to totally change themselves, take up smoking and start wearing lots of uncomfortable leather BUT THIS TIME IT’S A MAN.

See? Different! Better.

 

The free biology lesson

Grease 2 Reproduction

There is no substitute for thorough, honest and empowering sex education in all schools everywhere. But while we wait for the government to get its act together on that, at least we have Grease 2’s infamous ‘Reproduction’ song to teach us the basics!

Ps. humans don’t have pollen. But you knew that.

 

The talent show

grease 2 talent show

Have you ever seen such strong fancy dress game as the Pink Ladies’ Girl For All Seasons routine? That purple sequinned tree costume is Halloween #goals.

 

The fact that basically nobody else agrees

Steph Grease 2

Because just like Michael on that motorbike, we will always be rooting for the underdog. Grease 2 is the word.

People just love to tell you to cheer up when you’re feeling sad, don’t they?

“It’ll be ok!” they say, as you’re crying into your bowl of cereal because your period cramps make it feel like you’re being gutted alive. Or “you’ll make new friends, don’t sweat it!” when your parents move you to a new school, tear you away from your BFFs and fail to understand the sheer terror of eating lunch alone.

*Shudder*.

But whether you’re feeling weepy because of hormones or friends or the fact your crush isn’t smiling back, we have a ready-made solution for you: put on a good film.

Really. Finding a film that’ll let you cry your eyes out and then help you to see the good in the world again, will sort you right out. We’re never going to tell you to magically cheer up (because we know life doesn’t work like that), but instead we recommend wallowing in the weepiness for a while. Just long enough to kick you back into gear and help you maybe, just maybe, realise things aren’t actually that bad.

So we’ve collected together seven of our favourite films to watch when you’re down, angsty or feel like you just don’t fit in with everyone else. They’ll help you weep, wallow, and then see just a little, teeny-tiny bit of hope in the middle of all that bad stuff.

Fetch the popcorn! And the tissues. 

1. Inside Out

This brilliantly funny movie is all about a girl who is struggling with all of the rubbish life throws at you sometimes. Sound familiar? She has to deal with her parents, moving school and how hard it feels to miss old mates.

It’s not going to pretend that life is a magical fairytale like a lot of old school Disney movies – there’s no prince charming here, sorry. But what it will do is give you a brand new way to look at stuff… like maybe sadness is just normal and not always a bad thing? Yep, it’s a deep one. But there’s also lots of colour and silliness too; it’s a Pixar movie, after all.

2. Mean Girls

Mean Girls is a true high school classic. In centuries to come it’ll be considered one of the most iconic movies of our generation, probably.

It’s so good because everyone can relate to it. The main character finds herself in a new school where she doesn’t fit in with the cool girls. In fact, she finds it hard to fit in with most groups.

She goes on a journey to find out who her friends really are, which involves dressing up, lots of gossip and plenty of LOL-worthy moments. If you’ve ever felt like you don’t fit in no matter how much you do, then this one is for you.

3. The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid is one of those Disney classics that you can watch about 10,000 times without getting bored – especially if you like a good singalong. Which is another failsafe way to cure that down-in-the-dumps feeling by the way. We’ve heard.

If you’ve never seen it before (wow what? Get it now, now, now) you’re in for a real treat. Well, a sad treat in many ways. As it’s about a mermaid who falls in love with a human. Sounds sweet, right? Wrong. Because one has legs and the other has a tail. Isn’t life just so unfair sometimes?

Ideal medicine for your bad mood, you can cry, you’ll probably get angry, but then you learn a lot. Pay attention to the singing lobster, guys. That’s a good rule for life generally.

4. Zootopia

Ever wonder what a HUGE city run entirely by animals would love like? Well, enter Zootopia. It’s a film all about the way animals get on with each other and the main character is a fearless bunny. She’s got big dreams. Big ambitions. Big hopes. But she’s a teeny tiny bunny in a place where polar bears and tigers rule, so she has to adapt and use her bunny strength and bunny powers.

Zootopia has highs and lows, but the main take-home message is to do what you can with what you have, and stay strong. Which is something we all need to be reminded of from time to time, right? You fearless bunny, you.

5. Twilight

If you think your problems are bad, then take a look at Bella’s. She’s a bit of a misfit who falls in love with a boy – been there – but he’s a vampire and could very easily just eat her at any moment. Ouch.

True, Twilight isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. But it is a love story that’s also full of fantasy and feels like a modern take on a quirky fairy tale. It’s also full of eye candy and some of the big fight scenes will make all of your problems and emotions melt away. Promise.

6. My Girl

This one should come with a warning. It’s only if you want a good cry. A really good cry. It should not be viewed by those not looking for a good cry. Are we clear on this?

Okay, now that’s out of the way we’re onto the beauty of My Girl. It’s an older movie, but it’s a classic because it’s all about love and heartbreak and growing up, and now confusing and complicated all of those things can be. Which is just as true now as it was in 1991.

7. Frozen

In case you were living in an underground bunker for all of 2014 and don’t already know… Frozen is the story of two sisters, Elsa and Anna. They love each other a lot, but one has an icy secret that means she feels really out of place all the live-long day. Fair enough, we can’t all do the amazing things Elsa can, but that feeling is oh-so familiar.

For an animated musical it can get seriously emotional at times, but there’s also a talking snowman. And a very useful reminder that when life gets you down, you should, you know, let it go…

@BeccaCaddy

Image: Inside Out / Disney