You only have to type her name into Google to know that Barbie Ferreira is a pretty awesome chick. The American model is taking the fashion industry by storm thanks to a kickass, inclusive attitude which sees her challenging brands on their beauty ideals and refusing to retouch any of her Insta images. She’s outspoken, bold and totally beautiful. Here’s why she’s our #FollowFriday…

She talks truth

This 20 year old is sticking two fingers up to the idea that there’s a particular type of ‘beautiful’. She openly talks about the fact that the fashion industry still has a long way to go in terms of ‘plus-size’ models, telling Teen Vogue that she thinks brands have an “idealized version of a thick girl.”

Barbie and her squad of super sexy model mates discuss the things plus-size models are tired of hearing here…

Barbie craves change in the fashion industry and plans to “infiltrate from the inside”. She says: “Not only is the consumer being told they’re not good enough—even the girls in the pictures are given the same sh*t”. Her brutal honesty about the fashion industry makes us love her even more.

hangin w @maybelline n cacti

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She’s so real

We wanna be bffs with Barbie, she’s just so fiercely real. We really admire that she’s built her fame all on her own. Her huge fan base (350,000 Instagram followers) tune in to her posts because much like us, they’re obsessed.

Unlike many of the other models of the moment, she doesn’t have famous parents, but the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree – her mum features in her social media posts and is a total mega babe. Her relationship with her mum is another reason we love this totally real hun. Check out this super cute video of them cooking together as part of Barbie’s video series for Vogue #familygoals.

Hi mom

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She’s body confident

Unafraid of her imperfections, Barbie refuses to be silenced when it comes to beauty standards. She posts amazing pictures of herself and is proud to represent bodies ignored in both the fashion and beauty industry.

And it’s not just us hooked on Barbie’s beauty.

when u leave ur portfolio in the uber

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She’s totally woke

Our gal has a pretty good head on her shoulders too, often using her social media accounts to discuss important social issues.

Another of the videos in her Body Party series talks about body issues that men face. This allows guys to join the conversation – the outcome is pretty interesting tbh. Turns out we’re all the same anyways.

A librarian look sort of

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Barbie, we love you.

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

Take off your silver cape and pack away your furry shoes – London Fashion Week is winding down for another six months.

And in among all the usual designer labels, outrageous street style and soon-to-be-seen-on-Snapchat beauty trends (please can we make hair scarves happen?) that emerged, there was a very different kind of statement.

A group of awesome campaigners picketed LFW events in central London to protest against the lack of diversity in catwalk fashion. Using the hashtags #NoSizeFitsAll and #FashionForEveryBody, the protesters included plus size models, disabled models and campaigners from the Women’s Equality Party and fashion site Simply Be, all keen to make the fashion industry wake up and pay attention to women of all shapes, sizes, colours and varieties.

Among the fiercely-dressed squad holding up Simply Be’s #FashionForEveryBody signs were blogger Gabi Gregg, plus size model Iskra Lawence and Kelly Knox, one of the UK’s leading disabled models.

“I found when I became a model I was pigeon-holed to become a plus-sized model, and could only work for brands that weren’t cool or young,” said size 16 Jada Sezer, another megababe protestor. “The idea of plus-sized model was outdated – and representation for the average woman is non-existent.”

Meanwhile the #NoSizeFitsAll campaign, founded by feminist political party the WEP, is asking people to share photos of their clothes labels on social media to shake off the stigma of larger sizes and highlight how ridiculously sizes can vary from one shop to another.

It’s also calling for fashion magazines to include at least one plus size spread in each issue, and for the British Fashion Council to insist that all designers at London Fashion Week 2017 use models of at least two different sample sizes – one of which has to be a UK size 12 and above. Which, when we remember that the average woman in the UK is a size 16, doesn’t seem that unreasonable now does it?

And protesting LFW isn’t the only cool thing being done by the Women’s Equality Party to help girls and women feel good in their own skin. They’re also calling for PSHE lessons at school to include discussions on body image, “with a very specific focus on media depictions of beauty” – to remind us all that the photos we see in mags and ads are often about as real as having magical centaurs modelling clothes.

Which would be cooler than another parade of exclusively thin, white, able-bodied models, let’s be honest.

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

Image: Facebook / Simply Be USA