STEM is a little word, with big importance. It stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and it’s used to group together all those subjects that look at the physical, technical way that the world works. We all start off studying them in their simplest forms, though loads of us give up STEM along the way for more flowery subjects – and by ‘us’, we mean girls.

But perhaps more of us need to give STEM a second thought. And a third, and a fourth. Here’s why.

…because STEM subjects are fascinating

STEM can take you from the depths of the ocean to the furthest known galaxy – and everywhere in between. You can study the power of the sun, the movement of the planets, the algorithms of love, the beating of the heart, the ways in which prosthetics can replace limbs and organs, or the real secrets behind the most popular Instagram posts. Yes, really: that’s maths for you.

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“Physics was always a subject that I enjoyed – but when we got onto the more advanced subjects, everything opened up and became so much more interesting. I also realised that I loved the applied maths and the experimental side of physics,” says physicist Dr Charlotte Buckley.

“I loved my degree. Studying everything from quantum mechanics or the behaviour of light, up to the formation of stars, galaxies and the universe was incredibly rewarding.”

…because they make the world go round. Literally.

We don’t need to tell you how big a role technology has these days. Google, Facebook, Apple and Twitter basically own us – and if you can’t beat them, work for them. Or at least understand how they work.

Mathematics is, basically, problem solving. It’s the foundation of spaceships, of hydrology (that’s all things water, the reason you can have a shower each day), of architecture, accountancy – even democracy. What is voting but a numbers game? Scientists find cures for disease, contribute toward the making of everything from food to shampoo to cleaning products, and explore the universe.

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Engineering, meanwhile, is not just building bridges or working on oil rigs. “It can often have connotations of greasy overalls and spanners, but in fact [engineering] is a huge world of professions influencing the world that we live in,” says Vicki Greenwood, a chartered civil engineer and a construction project manager.

Engineering graduate Milly Belcher designed a simulated human jaw at Bristol uni to test new, chewable medicines; then, interning at Dyson, she found herself “designing, testing and evaluating products that, stereotypically, are used by women” – though ironically, the majority of her the workforce were male. Sigh. 

…because they need more women

Dyson is no exception. The numbers are scary, especially when you consider how important STEM subjects are to everything we do every day. Only 9% of the engineering workforce is female. Just 20% of A Level physics students are female, and only 14.4% of the science, tech, engineering and maths (STEM) workforce in the UK is female.

“Women represent half the workforce,” Vicki continues. “STEM subjects lead to careers that have a direct influence on our world. The world is losing a lot of innovative thinkers by not factoring in the female population.” And it has a real cost: “A balanced team will usually be more creative and have a more enjoyable and caring working environment, in my experience,” says Vicki, and indeed companies are shown to be 15% more likely to perform better if they are gender diverse.

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At school and at university, girls studying STEM are “in the minority,” says Milly. “You stand out.” Indeed, at her all-girls school, engineering was not even discussed as a possibility. “My friend and I were the first people from school to study Engineering at university, so application and career advice were limited. Later, at Dyson, she noticed her male colleagues struggle with making products like hairdryers user-friendly – “for example getting a feel for something like the weight of the product: it is difficult for men to contextualise what it feels like for a woman to use. I think that women can sometimes provide an insight that men may not have even considered.” 

…because studying STEM subjects does not make you a nerd

On the contrary, says Milly, “the majority of girls I met on my course were the opposite. They chose engineering because they enjoyed science and maths, but wanted to see a more practical, more creative side to those subjects. Outside of their studies they were heavily involved in sports, charity, etc – and had rich social lives.”

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“There is a very classic image of a woman physicist, which just isn’t true,” Charlotte agrees. “I have heard inspirational lectures from incredible women who have had to fight tooth and nail to get to the top of their profession.” The idea that everyone is super nerdy and can’t socialise is, she says (and I can second it, having seen her on a dance floor) totally not true.

…because they are NOT ‘men’s subjects’

Why do so few women go into STEM subjects? “Maybe young men are more confident in themselves and don’t mind taking on such ‘risky’ subjects, whereas girls are more likely to choose something they feel confident in,” Charlotte suggests.

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Of course there’s a perception that they are super hard – and we’re not saying it isn’t true. But that doesn’t make them ‘male’ any more than, er, cooking a soufflé is a female domain.

“There was one eccentric maths teacher who used to say ‘Girls should be in home economics’,” Charlotte laughs, “but I don’t think he was serious, and the three girls in the class would then get the best marks!” As she continued through university, “it became obvious that each person had different strengths in different areas, both technical and theoretical… I can’t really think of anything during my degree which I thought of as ‘male’ traits and ‘female’ traits.

…and it’s empowering stuff to know

After all, as the name suggests, everything starts with STEM.

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Check out STEMnet to find out more about the cool opportunities out there.

@finney_clare

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome. 

Image: Hailey Hamilton

Oh hey there! Have you noticed something different about us lately? Like maybe our BRAND NEW WEBSITE?! Isn’t it pret-ty?

Don’t worry, we haven’t just spent the week looking at our shiny new website and stroking the screen. Here are some of the other things we’ve been reading, watching and loving this week.

Youtube Rewind 

Alfie Deyes, Fleur De Force (hey, we met her!) and Casper Lee are among the 200 YouTubers from 18 countries that participated in this year’s YouTube Rewind. The video includes the biggest viral trends of 2016 – from the mannequin challenge, to the water bottle flip – and, of course, the 100 layers challenge. 2016 has truly been a bizarre year…

The Clothes Show 2016

This week, the betty team boarded the betty bus and headed to The Clothes Show. You can read about everything we got up to hereOr you can watch our vlog. Or do both. Totally your call.

Giraffes may face extinction

It turns out the literal giants of the animal kingdom that roam southern and eastern Africa are now classed as vulnerable on the latest global Red List of Threatened Species. It’s thought they’re being pushed towards a “silent” extinction because of illegal hunting (weep) and habitat loss, with their numbers falling 40% in the last 30 years.

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13-year-old invents bandage that helps wounds heal faster

Anushka Naiknaware has developed a bandage that senses the moisture in a wound dressing (which tbh, sounds super complicated and involves something called nanoparticles). Her bandage allows doctors to monitor the moisture in the wound without even having to unwrap the dressing. It’s a huge break through because the healthier the moisture range, the faster a wound heals.

Her idea won her the Lego Education Builder Award at the 2016 Google Science Fair. Which, totally NBD, comes with $15,000, a trip to Denmark, and a one-year mentorship with Lego to help get the project into production. What a boss.

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So…Space Poop is a thing

If there are any budding scientists out there who are a bit miffed that Anushka beat them to the Lego Education Builder Award, fear not because you don’t always have to be number two (lol). No, but for reals, NASA is holding a competition to solve one of life’s greatest mysteries: how to do a poo in zero gravity. Currently astronauts diaper up, but NASA thinks there’s gotta be a better system out there. If you’ve got any ideas, dump ’em here.

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The Queen is hiring

You might want to brush up your CV because the Queen is looking for some interns. That’s right, when Prince Harry was on his two-week royal tour of the Caribbean (sigh), he announced that his Grandma would be offering up nine new scholarships to young professionals seeking to improve their hospitality skills. The slight snag? You have to be a resident of one of the Queen’s realms of the Caribbean, which, we’ve gotta admit sounds a little Game of Thrones-y, even for Her Majesty.

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Greek philosopher schools us in the art of rejection

The Greek philosopher and mathematician, Hypatia, came up with the most incredible way possible to ward off one of her male suitors… she threw her sanitary pads at him. Maybe we’ll try this next time.

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Have a good weekend – we’ll see you Monday!

It’s time you started celebrating your period, guys. Sign up to bettybox RN and get all your tampons and pads, beauty products, sweet treats and loads more cool stuff delivered to your door, every single month. We know. It’s totally awesome.